You Review a Local Author: Ritual: The Magical Perspective – Luc Sala

In January, we started with a new event series: Meet My Book! These events give local authors a chance to present their book to a live audience. Each Meet My Book! author provides 2 review copies that are reviewed by a group of ABC customers who signed up for the You Review a Local Author program.

This inaugural post combines two reviews of Ritual: The Magical Perspective by Luc Sala, who was one of the authors at the very first Meet My Book! in January.  Ritual: The Magical Perspective is self-published and printed at ABC on our Espresso Book Machines.

Reviewed by Catarina Queiroz

In Ritual, the Magical Perspective, Luc Sala defends that rituals are basically practical and effective magic, present everywhere even if we don’t acknowledge them. Through extensive explanations with reference to a large number of different sources that range from philosophers to magicians, Sala addresses the basics of rituals according to his research and personal experience with the spiritual realm.

The first volume points out that, regarding rituals, our focus should be on the magical, the spiritual world, which can be reached once we learn how to let go of our ego and access our true self or inner child. According to Sala, rituals existed before language, myth or religion. They were a decisive factor in the creation of cultural identity and helped prehistoric men build a structured society, thus enabling progress and modern civilization as we know it. The author also attempts to make a connection between rituals and the notion of information, raising some good questions about rituals in virtual environments, cyberspace ethics and information freedom. The second volume is practical and aims to elucidate the theories presented with the study of rituals related to fire.

This is an interesting book if you’re into the theme and are keen to find arguments in favor of the effectiveness of magic. On the other hand, it’s kind of overwhelming in terms of size and references to different thinkers, perspectives and historical moments. The approach is also very personal (the author makes a point of saying so) and I think that without a background on the various references that Sala mentions it’s difficult to have a clear understanding or position about the book. Nevertheless, the author’s intention is clear: it’s urgent that we embrace the magical aspect of life, accepting ritual as a bridge between the material and spiritual worlds.

Reviewed by Richard Metcalf

This is an audacious and thought-provoking work by a fascinating author. In this self-published volume Luc Sala – entrepreneur, would-be politician, psychonaut, and writer – sets out his views on ritual, and examines its role in just about every aspect of the known (and unknown) universe.

Sala claims that – in contrast to a “ceremony”, which has a merely social and psychological function – a proper “ritual” involves a conscious attempt to change the world (both future and past) through an intangible connection to “the otherworld”, and argues that contemporary science (quantum brain, string theory) offers a possible explanation for how this back door to the universe works.

In over 500 large, two-column pages, Sala presents his personal views and theories, together with a survey of other perspectives in an impassioned, rambling style which make it sometimes hard to find the thread of his arguments. There is something rather dubious about such passionate advocacy of the power of the magical arts, and there’s a hint of frustration at an inability to change the world through more conventional means (the author seemingly believes that the “thought police” behind the “Wikipedia website” have it in for him). If rituals can effect real change through magical means, why bother to argue the point? Surely it’s better to spend your time performing those powerful rituals? True enough, in Sala’s definition, the publication of a book could clearly qualify as a series of rituals, but this one might have more impact after a hefty spell of “Wielding the Magical Red Pen”.

Despite these misgivings, there is a huge amount of interesting information here (Timothy Leary, Burning Man, Roger Penrose, Aleister Crowley and Rudolf Steiner all get a mention or three), accompanied by striking illustrations, and it’s certainly worth giving Sala’s multi-faceted perspective some degree of consideration.

Ritual: The Magical Perspective is a relatively long and somewhat frustrating read; but it’s also highly entertaining, and in a way, curiously compelling. (Hmmm… Who knows, perhaps there is some strange magic at work here after all?)

You Review a Local Author: Books with an orange connection, reviewed by ABC customers.